Table 3– The relationship between quality of life (QoL) or health status (HS) and fatigue
StudySample sizeStudy designQuestionnaires usedResults
[5]145 patientsCross-sectionalFatigue: FAS
QoL: WHOQOL-100
Fatigue was negatively related to all WHOQOL domains and the general facet
Females were more tired and had worse QoL on all domains compared with males
[14]64 patients and 64 matched controlsCross-sectionalFatigue: WHOQOL-100
QoL: WHOQOL-100
The energy and fatigue facet was unrelated to the QoL domain on psychological health
[20]22 patients and 21 matched controlsCross-sectionalFatigue: CRDQ fatigue domain
HS: SF-36
Fatigue correlated highly with all HS scales
[16]142 patientsCross-sectionalFatigue: FAS
HS: SGRQ
Fatigue correlated highly with all HS scales
[26]150 patientsCross-sectionalFatigue: Symptom Inventory Questionnaire
QoL: WHOQOL-100
Fatigue was a negative predictor of the QoL domains physical health, psychological health and level of independence
[31]441 patientsCross-sectionalFatigue: FAS
QoL: WHOQOL-BREF
Fatigue (together with depressive symptoms) predicted overall QoL (p<0.001)
[13]75 patientsCross-sectionalFatigue: CIS
HS: SF-36
Fatigued patients scored lower on all HS scales (all p<0.001)
  • FAS: Fatigue Assessment Scale; WHOQOL: World Health Organization questionnaire of Quality of Life; CRDQ: Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire; SGRQ: St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire; CIS: Checklist Individual Strength; SF: Short Form.